Story Teaser: Alexandre Dumas’ Three Musketeers

 A Spoiler-Free STORY TEASER for ALEXANDRE DUMAS’ Beloved Classic THE THREE MUSKETEERS…

by Ambra Gargini

The year is 1626 and King Louis XIII and Queen Anne of Austria sit on the throne of France. The queen is abandoned by the king, spied on by the cardinal and betrayed by everyone. The only person she can trust is her maid, Constance Bonacieux.

THE  THREE  MUSKETEERS

From Alexandre Dumas, author of The Count of Monte Cristo, comes an enduring tale of friendship, disillusionment and betrayal. Richard Pevear said “We think of The Three Musketeers as a novel of action and adventure, of duels, skirmishes, galloping horses, and yet it is nine-tenths dialogue. The suspense comes most often not from what the characters are about to do to each other, but from what they are about to say to each other. It is based not so much on narrative action as on dramatic confrontation.” 

D’Artagnan, the son of an impoverished nobleman, arrives in Paris bent upon fulfilling his dream to become a musketeer. Constance entreats d’Artagnan to save the queen from disgrace after the two of them are thrown together while escaping one of the cardinal’s traps. D’Artagnan jumps at the chance to please Constance and instantly enlists the help of his friends—the three musketeers—Athos, Porthos and Aramis. The four friends swear that they will either return victorious in the queen’s cause or they will never return. 

A stack of translations of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas sit halfway up a set of stone steps. The translations by Richard Pevear (2006), William Robson (1853) and William Barrow (1846) are stacked on a lower step while the translation by Will Hobson (2014) stands upright on its own one step up. There is a battered silver tankard in the foreground. A teal glass vase with golden sunflowers is behind the books and golden petals are scattered over the steps. The scene is in the shade and lit with isolated beams of sunlight.
A stack of translations of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas sit halfway up a set of stone steps. The translations by Richard Pevear (2006), William Robson (1853) and William Barrow (1846) are stacked on a lower step while the translation by Will Hobson (2014) stands upright on its own one step up. There is a battered silver tankard in the foreground. A teal glass vase with golden sunflowers is behind the books and golden petals are scattered over the steps. The scene is in the shade and lit with isolated beams of sunlight.

“Without any great fear of contradiction it may be said that no translated foreign romance has had so many editions published in the English speaking world as ‘Les Trois Mousquetaires’”

“Without any great fear of contradiction it may be said that no translated foreign romance has had so many editions published in the English speaking world as ‘Les Trois Mousquetaires’” 

Douglas Munro 

After Constance is kidnapped, d’Artagnan tries to find out her whereabouts from a beautiful and mysterious woman known as Milady. D’Artagnan quickly becomes obsessed with Milady and is torn between his attraction to her and his love for Constance. Tragically, d’Artagnan sows the seeds of his own heartbreak when he betrays Milady to a terrible degradation.

Please check out my review of the best translation The Three Musketeers.

Portia, a Blenheim Cavalier King Charles Spaniel sits on a stone wall in front of a stack of translations of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas. The translations from top to bottom are: Will Hobson (2014), Richard Pevear (2006), William Robson (1853) and William Barrow (1846). A single antique silver tankard stands beside the books. A teal glass vase with golden sunflowers is behind the books and golden petals are scattered along the wall. There are green-leaved oaks and rosemary in the background bokeh. The scene is backlit and flooded with sunlight.
Portia, a Blenheim Cavalier King Charles Spaniel sits on a stone wall in front of a stack of translations of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas. The translations from top to bottom are: Will Hobson (2014), Richard Pevear (2006), William Robson (1853) and William Barrow (1846). A single antique silver tankard stands beside the books. A teal glass vase with golden sunflowers is behind the books and golden petals are scattered along the wall. There are green-leaved oaks and rosemary in the background bokeh. The scene is backlit and flooded with sunlight.

Portia upstages a stack of translations of The Three Musketeers. 

All photographs, original for this post, are by Ambra Gargini.

This post has not been sponsored in any way. The thoughts and opinions I have expressed are my own.